History/Social Sciences Course Offerings

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HISTORY Courses

Academic Teaching Assistant in Middle School or High School Classes

Graduation Credits: N/A
Credit Type: School Service
Prerequisites: Teacher approval (form available)

High school students may arrange to assist in a middle school academic class in which they have significant experience with the discipline, or a high school class in which they have already earned credit. This is an opportunity to earn school service credit, but NOT academic credit. TAs are expected to check in with the cooperating teacher regularly, participate fully in each class, model class expectations, assist in supporting students and the teacher whenever possible, and engage in pre-planning if taking a lead role as teacher. Prior teacher permission is required.

 

Comparative World Literature and History (HSS123)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences (American History) OR ELA
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This course takes us on a trip around the world studying literature from other countries. We will read, write, and discuss works from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. As we read and analyze fiction and nonfiction from different countries, we will think about how cultures shape people’s experiences. We will also work to break down our own assumptions. Let’s figure out through our own travels–on and off the page–what we have in common with those from foreign lands and what divides us so that we can unravel some of history's major conflicts.

Electoral Politics (HSS126)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This course explores the democratic process in the United States, with particular attention to the presidential election. Students begin by reviewing the structure of government in the US as outlined by the Constitution, including the jobs of the President, Congress, and the Federal Courts. They then learn about the process through which elections are held, including election financing, polling, the role of the media, the Electoral College, gerrymandering, and other related phenomena. Students research and initiate a civics action project of their choosing, and investigate the ways in which the changing demographics of America have influenced the electoral process over time.

 

Foundations of Humanities

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: Administrator Recommendation

"Foundations" courses are aligned to PVPA's core academic courses at the high school level, yet course objectives are individualized to appropriately meet students' specific learning needs. These courses occur in an inclusion model, with students participating in classes with their peers in the general education setting.

Foundations of U.S. History 1

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: Administrator Recommendation

"Foundations" courses are aligned to PVPA's core academic courses at the high school level, yet course objectives are individualized to appropriately meet students' specific learning needs. These courses occur in an inclusion model, with students participating in classes with their peers in the general education setting.

 

Foundations of U.S. History 2

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: Administrator Recommendation

"Foundations" courses are aligned to PVPA's core academic courses at the high school level, yet course objectives are individualized to appropriately meet students' specific learning needs. These courses occur in an inclusion model, with students participating in classes with their peers in the general education setting.

Foundations of U.S. History 3

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: Administrator Recommendation

"Foundations" courses are aligned to PVPA's core academic courses at the high school level, yet course objectives are individualized to appropriately meet students' specific learning needs. These courses occur in an inclusion model, with students participating in classes with their peers in the general education setting.

 

Foundations of U.S. History 4

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: Administrator Recommendation

"Foundations" courses are aligned to PVPA's core academic courses at the high school level, yet course objectives are individualized to appropriately meet students' specific learning needs. These courses occur in an inclusion model, with students participating in classes with their peers in the general education setting.

Globalization (HSS110)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

In this class, we will explore the phenomenon known as Globalization, and its effects upon the economies, environments, and peoples of the world. Students will study the rise of colonialism, imperialism and the economic and political roots of the modern world with a special emphasis on the latter part of the 20th Century leading into the world we live in today. We will then move on to dissect some of Globalization’s key players and power dynamics around the world. Students will then explore the effects of Globalization on First World/Third World relations, women and children, the environment, immigration and more in research topics of their choosing.

 

Greek and Roman History (HSS129)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This course provides an introduction to the ancient Greek world. Students learn about important individuals and events in the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods of Greek history. Topics include the rivalry between Athens and Sparta, the Persian and Pelopponesian wars, Greek art and culture during Pericles’ golden age, famous Greek philosophers (including Socrates, Aristotle and Plato), and the conquests and legacy of Alexander the Great. Special consideration is given to examining different aspects of daily life in Ancient Greece.

HerStory: American Women's History (HSS103)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

“From Seneca Falls to #MeToo,” this class explores the history of the women of America and their ongoing struggle for not only legal, but economic and social equality. We begin with the struggle for legal rights by focusing on the fight to gain the vote, including the major events and strategies that led to the success of that movement. From there we follow the struggle for equal rights through the Second Wave of Feminism, Title IX, and the defeat of the ERA (Equal Rights Amendment). Finally, we delve into the Third Wave of Feminism and the #MeToo movement. Students will “be” the history through simulations, debates and trials.

 

Holocaust Studies (HSS105)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This course explores the history of the Holocaust from its roots in anti-semitism through the present day. Emphasis is on a serious discussion of the issues of genocide through a detailed examination of this history. Students learn the "why" behind events, as well as the human reactions of the people. Students write a substantial research paper, and explore some of the literature related to the topic.

Humanities 7 (HIS107)

Graduation Credits: N/A
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: None

This is a two-year program for 7th and 8th graders which integrates English Language Arts and Social Studies. Students learn about important social issues and work as a class to find ways to create a more peaceful and socially just world. We explore social studies through reading, writing, and literature. Students also learn developmentally appropriate language arts skills including expository, research, analytical, and creative writing. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning through a variety of arts-based projects, presentations, and performances.

 

Humanities 8 (HIS108)

Graduation Credits: N/A
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: None

This is a two-year program for 7th and 8th graders which integrates English Language Arts and Social Studies. Students learn about important social issues and work as a class to find ways to create a more peaceful and socially just world. We explore social studies through reading, writing, and literature. Students also learn developmentally appropriate language arts skills including expository, research, analytical, and creative writing. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning through a variety of arts-based projects, presentations, and performances.

Revolutions (HSS116)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

“Revolution!” This word has been used to describe some of the most important events in modern world history. Quite recently, a wave of nonviolent protest movements have been challenging governments around the globe. What factors cause a revolution to be successful? Students in this course will use a five-factor theory to analyze and evaluate both present day and historic revolutionary movements. We will analyze the French, Haitian, Russian, and Chinese revolutions as a class. Students will then “adopt” a different revolution of their choice to analyze for a class presentation. Throughout the class, students will be encouraged to explore the importance of the arts in revolutionary movements. Students should know that they will be expected to spend several hours reading and analyzing both primary and secondary source documents outside of class each week.

 

The 1960s Arts and Culture (HSS118)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/SS, American History, Music Culture/Technique (concentration only)
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This is an integrated arts/history/politics course about one of the most critical decades in United States history. We examine the 1960s, not just from a historical and political point of view, but also delve deeply into the cultures of the time period, primarily through the arts. There are extensive readings and intensive written assignments, including a substantial research paper, as well as arts-based projects.

Topics in American Studies (HSS104)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences (American History) OR ELA
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

This interdisciplinary course asks the questions of what is “America” and what does it mean to be an “American?” We will explore American traditions and diverse cultural expressions through literature, history, politics, music, and art as we search for answers. American Studies is an ongoing conversation, and together we will work to understand how Americans of different backgrounds, living during different time periods, have created the idea of an American identity. Students will undertake individual projects on topics of their choice--perhaps a look at Broadway, the relationship between food and community, or the creation of memorials and national parks. We will read, write, research, argue, and create together.

 

U.S. History 1 (HIS119)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: None

The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution are founding documents central to the understanding of what it means to be an American. Students begin the semester by reading, analyzing and evaluating the ideas in these documents as they participate in classroom activities, including a ratification convention for the United States Constitution. Framers of the United States Constitution often disagreed with each other and eventually compromised on a number of issues including slavery. Conflicting views on liberty and what it means to be an American continue to be a focal point of the course as students learn about important individuals, organizations and events in the years leading up to and during the Civil War.

U.S. History 2 (HIS120)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: None

This course begins by asking the question, “How did the United States become the greatest economic power in the world?” Students learn about important individuals, ideas, and events during the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. In the first unit, students evaluate whether the Reconstruction period was ultimately a success or a failure. Students then explore factors that influenced America’s growing economic power, including industrialization, immigration and westward migration. The semester concludes with an evaluation of America’s changing role in the world as students examine America’s growing military power in the years surrounding the Spanish American War.

 

U.S. History 3 (HIS121)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: None

This course introduces students to a variety of social and political events of 20th Century America. We begin with a look at World War I, and how the "Great War" set the stage for things to come. We then investigate the postwar years, and the cultural and economic explosion during the Roaring 20s, before moving on to learn from first-hand accounts of the Great Depression and progressive vision of the New Deal. We end with an exploration of the events, effects and aftermath of World War II, including the rise of Hitler, and the decision to drop the atom bomb on Japan. Emphasis is equally distributed through cultural, political, and economical perspectives, and multiple social viewpoints. Because of the growing role of the media during this time period, this course allows for extensive use of oral history, television, Hollywood movies, newspaper footage, and musical recordings.

U.S. History 4 (HIS122)

Graduation Credits: 5
Credit Type: History/Social Sciences, American History
Prerequisites: U.S. History 3

Students analyze the trends and events that shaped late 20th Century America, and led to the world in which we currently live. The course covers the last half of the 20th Century, from the beginning of the Cold War through the Vietnam War, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War and 9/11. Students also examine the continuing struggle for equal rights in American society. From the Presidency of Dwight Eisenhower to the Clinton years, students consider how the United States has changed politically and culturally.

 

 

See other department catalogs
ENGLISH LA | HISTORY/SS | MATH | SCIENCE | WORLD LANG
DANCE | MUSIC | THEATER | VISUAL ARTS/TECH